Brushing Your English Bulldog Puppy's Teeth

Brushing Your English Bulldog Puppy's Teeth

The protruding lower jaw of English Bulldog puppies is one of those adorable hits that we just can not get enough of. Ever notice those little teeth sticking out are always so white and clean? That does not just happen. Brushing your English Bulldog puppy's teeth is very important to their health … and their smile!

Keeping your puppy's teeth clean and healthy is not just for appearance. Plaque and tartar can build up causing cavities and decay if not treated. This could result in having teeth removed if the decay is too bad or causing pain to your pup. Your dog's teeth are just as important as our own and keeping them clean is vital.

Getting your English Bulldog puppy used to teeth cleansing routine is easy, if you start as a young age. The first step is allowing your pup to tolerate your fingers in his mouth. Start by gently rubbing his gums with the tip of your finger for a few seconds and praise him each time you retreat. Slowly increase the amount of time you keep your finger in his mouth. You can even try putting some soup, gravy or a small amount of peanut butter on your finger for your pup to taste while you're doing this.

After he is doing well with the first step, try putting a rag or gauze on the tip of your finger to get him used to the sensation of something other than your skin. Follow the same steps as above to get him used to this. Occasionally, you'll be able to move up to a tooth brush with hardly any resistance.

There are many doggie tooth pastes out there that are flavored and make brushing your English Bulldog puppy's teeth easier. While brushing your dog's teeth at all is great, you may want something that will protect and whiten his teeth more than these tooth pastes do. Never use any human tooth pastes as these will make your English Bulldog puppy feel sick if ingested.

If doggie tooth pastes are not appealing to you, try mixing a small amount of baking soda in some lukewarm water. Be sure the baking soda is dissolved and dip the tooth brush or rag in the water. The baking soda will help to reduce acid in the mouth and whiten the teeth at the same time. Your pup will probably dislike this more than the doggie tooth paste because of the flavor but it will provide better protection.

Be sure to keep a regular teeth cleansing routine such as once or twice per week. In between cleanings, provide your English Bulldog puppy with bones or toys that are conducive to cleaning teeth such as those with small knobs to massage gums and teeth to break away tartar and plaque.

Following these routines will be sure to get your English Bulldog puppy a clean teeth award at your next vet visit!

Source by Kilian Allen

English Cocker Spaniel Puppy And Dog Information

English Cocker Spaniel Puppy And Dog Information

The English Cocker Spaniel can make a great family dog. She has a great temperament, is highly trainable and loves her human family. She needs extensive exercise so either a properly fenced in back yard and or frequent vigils are a necessity. She requires above average grooming care due to her long pendulous ears and her long and silky coat. She generally gets along well with other pets, especially if socialized young. She loves children but may need to calm herself down with them. As a reminder, never leave children unsupervised with a dog or puppy.

Approximate Adult Size

The approximate adult size (two years old or older) of the male English Cocker Spaniel is 16 to 17 inches to the withers (highest point of the shoulder) and 28 to 34 pounds. The female ranges from 15 to 16 inches to the withers and 26 to 32 pounds.

Special Health Considerations

Most dog breeds have certain inherited health problems associated with that specific breed and the English Cocker Spaniel is no exception. Be on the look out for ear infections and Progressive Retinal Atrophy (inherited disease of the retina that can cause vision loss and blindness). This disease list is an informative guideline only. Other diseases may also be significant threats, please contact your veterinarian for a complete list.

She should visit the veterinarian several times in the first year for shots, boosters and check up. Then, as an adult, she should visit the veterinarian year for shots and check up. As she gets older, six years and on, she should visit the veterinarian twice a year for check ups and shots. Remember; avoid feeding your dog sweets.

Grooming

The English Cocker Spaniel has a silky, fine, medium length, slightly wavy or flat coat. She will benefit from occasional professional grooming. She should be brushed regularly. Brushing will help her maintain a clean and healthy coat, avoid mats and help you keep a close eye on her health and strengthen your emotional bond with her. Dry shampoo or bathe as she needs it. Her hair around her feet need attention also.

Her ears should be specifically checked once a week and be kept clean. If you have her professionally groomed, make sure ear cleaning and inspection is part of the package. No water or excess fluid should get in the dogs ears, and do not try to irrigate the ears. Ear cleaning is too complicated and critical to instruct here. Look for hair growing in the ear canal, excess wax, or moisture. If her ears have a discharge, foul odor or she seems to be in distress and you suspect an infection, or tumor, consult your veterinarian.

Her teeth should be brushed at least twice a week with toothpaste and toothbrush designed for dogs. Brushing removes the accumulation of plaque and tartar which can cause cavities (rarely) and periodontal disease. Dog periodontal disease can lead to pain, loss of teeth, bad breath and other serious disease.

Her toenails may need to be examined for growth and clipped regularly. The toenails of the rear feet grow slower than the toenails of the front feet. Generally a guillotine type trimmer is the best for this chore and competent instructions to accomplish this can be found on the net.

Life Span

The English Cocker Spaniel can live between 12 and 15 years with proper nutrition, medical care and excellent living conditions.

History

The English Cocker Spaniel comes from coming from Wales and southwest England where they were used for hunting game and retrieval. They were first registered by the American Kennel Association in 1878.

Some Registries

  • English Cocker Spaniel Club of America, Inc.
  • UKC United Kennel Club
  • NKC National Kennel Club
  • CKC Continental Kennel Club
  • APRI Americas Pet Registry Inc.
  • AKC American Kennel Club
  • FCI Federation Cynologique Internationale
  • NZKC New Zealand Kennel Club
  • KCGB Kennel Club of Great Britain
  • ANKC Australian National Kennel Club
  • ACR American Canine Registry

Litter Size

3 to 8 English Cocker Spaniel puppies

Category

Gundog, Sporting

Terms To Describe

Active, merry, energy, alive, affectionate, good disposition, faithful, good companion

SPECIAL GOOD POINTS

  • Good watch dog.
  • High learning rate.
  • High obedience.
  • Easy to train.
  • Generally a good child dog.
  • Can tolerate cold.

SPECIAL BAD POINTS

  • Poor guard dog.
  • She needs major exercise.

Other Names Known By

Cocker Spaniel

Every dog ​​is an individual so not everything in this information may be correct for your dog. This information is meant as a good faith guideline only.

Source by Mitch Endick

English Foxhound Puppy And Dog Information

English Foxhound Puppy And Dog Information

The English Foxhound is a very active dog that was used to hunt in packs. She does well with other dogs due to her heritage. She is not considered a family pet because she really needs other dogs and she also must be exercised intensively. She is a very healthy breed and easy as far as grooming is concerned. She is good with children. As a reminder, never leave a child unsupervised with a puppy or dog.

Approximate Adult Size

The approximate adult size (two years old or older) of the male English Foxhound is 22 to 25 inches to the withers (highest point of the shoulder). The female ranges from 21 to 24 inches to the withers. Either sex rates from 65 to 70 pounds.

Special Health Considerations

Most dog breeds have certain inherited health problems associated with that specific breed but the English Foxhound has no serious inherited diseases.

She should visit the veterinarian several times in the first year for shots, boosters and check up. Then, as an adult, she should visit the veterinarian year for shots and check up. As she gets older, six years and on, she should visit the veterinarian twice a year for check ups and shots. Remember; avoid feeding your dog sweets.

Grooming

The English Foxhound has a short, dense and hard coat that is easy to care for. She just needs an occasional rubbing down and brushing to keep her looking good. Brushing will help her maintain a clean and healthy coat and help you keep a close eye on her health and strengthen your emotional bond with her.

Her teeth should be brushed at least twice a week with toothpaste and toothbrush designed for dogs. Brushing removes the accumulation of plaque and tartar which can cause cavities (rarely) and periodontal disease. Dog periodontal disease can lead to pain, loss of teeth, bad breath and other serious disease.

Her toenails may need to be examined for growth and clipped regularly. The toenails of the rear feet grow slower than the toenails of the front feet. Generally a guillotine type trimmer is the best for this chore and competent instructions to accomplish this can be found on the net.

Life Span

The English Foxhound can live between 10 and 14 years with proper nutrition, medical care and excellent living conditions.

History

The English Foxhound breed was developed in Great Britain. They were used as a pack hunter. Their genetic roots come from the Greyhound, Bulldog, Fox Terrier and other assorted hounds. They were first registered by the American Kennel Association in 1909.

Some Registries

  • Foxhound Club of America
  • UKC United Kennel Club
  • NKC National Kennel Club
  • CKC Continental Kennel Club
  • APRI Americas Pet Registry Inc.
  • AKC American Kennel Club
  • FCI Federation Cynologique Internationale
  • NZKC New Zealand Kennel Club
  • KCGB Kennel Club of Great Britain
  • ANKC Australian National Kennel Club
  • ACR American Canine Registry

Litter Size

5 to 7 English Foxhound puppies

Category

Hound

Terms To Describe

Lively, strong, active, elegant, friendly, loyal

SPECIAL GOOD POINTS

  • Good watch dog.
  • Good pack hunting dog.

SPECIAL BAD POINTS

  • They are slow learners.
  • Typically kept as a group, not a family pet.
  • Scent will distract them.
  • Poor guard dog.
  • They will wander off if not restrained.
  • She likes to bay.

Other Names Known By

Foxhound

Every dog ​​is an individual so not everything in this information may be correct for your dog. This information is meant as a good faith guideline only.

Source by Mitch Endick

Overheating in English Bulldogs

Overheating in English Bulldogs

English Bulldogs are the gentlest and friendliest of dog breeds, although they do have their own brand of stubbornness at times; they are very loyal to their owners. Because of their temperament, they easily get along with other animals and make great pets for children. As a puppy, the English bulldog can be highly energetic; however this mellows as they grow older. Being a non-sporting dog, they do not like to exercise mostly due to their airway obstruction, making them pant and breathe harder than other dogs. This adorable dog breed, lie other short-faced dogs is quite prone to overheating and heat stroke which is one of their primary health concerns. Despite this, owners should still make sure that their dogs get enough exercise as they can be prone to being overweight which can cause other health concerns on their joints, heart and lungs.

English Bulldogs are very sensitive to heat, although they have their own cooling system like most dogs, panting which cools them is very difficult for short/stout faced dogs with an under bite, whether it is a puppy or fully grown English bulldogs. Breathing is very hard for this breed since they have small tracheas, some abnormally smaller than most. Because of their facial structure it is also very common for them to have clogged or pinched nasal passages, making breathing a labor. All these issues combined can make them overheat and experience hyperthermia, ten times faster than other dog breeds.

Symptoms of Overheating in English Bulldogs

Reading the signs of overheating can become easy if you know your English bulldog well enough to know that he is not acting normally. Watch out for signs of extreme lethargy, irregular breathing, vomiting and sometimes even convulsions can be signs of heatstroke for both adult and puppy bulldogs. Check his eyes and gums for signs of overheating. Look your pet straight in the eyes and try to get his attention to focus on you, or use a favorite toy to see if he has problems focusing his eyes. Check his gums for capillary response time (CRT) by pressing your fingers in his gums, release it and count how many seconds it takes for it to get back from white to pink, the normal rate is less than 2 seconds. Checking for CRT must be done with caution, especially if you have an irritable pet.

What to Do

If you fear that your pet is experiencing heatstroke or overheating, there are a few steps you can take while waiting to get to the vet. English Bulldogs don’t do well in hot or warm areas so move them immediately to a cool, possible air-conditioned room. Give him water, if it is a puppy, you may need to resort to bottle feeding. Get a wet towel and dab it on his nose and his entire body, or have him lie down on a cooling mattress or a bag of ice.

When it comes to overheating in English Bulldogs, prevention is better than cure. Do not leave them out in the sun too long, give them light to moderate exercise and keep them well hydrated at all times and you can guarantee that you’ll have one cool customer who will love you more than ever.

Source by Lea Mullins

Solving Behavior Problems in Your English Mastiff Dog

Solving Behavior Problems in Your English Mastiff Dog

Mastiff dogs are not mean dogs; However, they are huge and imposing. If they are not properly trained at an early age they will quickly figure out that their size gives them control. This can lead to some behavior problems in your English Mastiff dog. The following are suggestions to solving some behavioral problems in Mastiffs.

Aggression

Aggression can be a problem with Mastiffs. Since they often outweigh their owners they can be found pushing ahead of people, shoving people out of their way, refusing to get off furniture, or guarding food and toys.

To prevent aggressive behavior you must take control and not allow it. For instance, if your mastiff pushes ahead of you through doorways, teach him to sit at the doorway until you give the signal to come. Instead of retreating when your dog shoves you, push him back, inviting his space. Your actions will teach your dog that you are in control. Never be cruel to your pet. You can use a distraction such as a toy or treat to lure him when he is misbehaving- such as refusing to get off the sofa. Always reward good behavior. Spaying or neutering can also reduce aggressive behavior.

Excessive Barking

If your English Mastiff dog has a problem with excessive barking you need to determine why because this is not a common problem in Mastiff dogs. It could be that your dog is bored or lonely. Be sure that you spend plenty of time with your with your dog and that he has toys and play time.

To deter your dog from barking you can wrap you hand around his muzzle and say "Quiet" or "No Barking." Be sure to praise him when he quiets down. You can use what is called a "shake can" to discourage barking. When your dog barks, take a soda can with a few pennies or pebbles in it (taped shut), and throw it in the direction of your pet. Do not hit him with it. The idea is that the noise with startle your dog and so he stops barking. Then, again, praise him for being quiet.

Chewing

Like many other breeds, Mastiffs love to chew on anything and everything. This habit needs to be controlled from the beginning. Providing appropriate chew toys while he young is very helpful. Keep valuable items out of reach of your Mastiff and be sure to rotate the chew toys so your dog will not get bored.

If you see your English Mastiff chewing on something he should not, take the object away and replace it with an acceptable toy to chew on. Praise him for chewing on the appropriate item. Be diligent and observant.

Jumping Up

Most people view their pet jumping up as a welcome. However, this thinking is incorrect. Jumping up is a sign of dominant behavior and should be discouraged, especially in giant breeds such as Mastiffs. Teach your puppy that sitting will be rewarded with attention, but jumping up will be ignored. If your Mastiff tries to jump up on you, step back or turn away so that no contact is made. Then tell him to sit and praise him when he obeys the command.

Shyness

A common problem among Mastiffs is shyness. Shyness can be an inborn condition or it can develop due to lack of socialization. Socialization is one of the most critical aspects of owning a Mastiff. It can be quite difficult to take your dog to the vet, or go on a trip with him if prefers to stay at home and only wants to interact with the family. Take your puppy out as often as possible. Allow your dog to meet people in different places. You can help him get used to other dogs and pets by regularly walking him at a dog park.

These are a few solutions to some of the behavioral problems you can encounter with your English Mastiff dog. Training should start at an early age and this will help to eliminate future problems. If you have severe behavior problems with your dog you might want to get the advice of his veterinarian or see a specialist.



Source by Sam Daniels

Why do English Springer Spaniels Make Great Pets and Companions?

I am going to highlight the main points about English Springer Spaniels and why they make great pets and companions. Many people do not realise that having a pet in the family is an important part of raising well balanced children. Even if you don’t have a family, there are many reasons why a Springer could be good for you too.

Teaching Care

Caring for a pet in sickness and in health, and having responsibility for feeding another dependent living creature prepares your children for the time when they will have children of their own. The lifespan of a Springer is in the range 10-15 years. They go through their lives from beginning to end whilst your children are still growing up.

Lowering Stress

Of course, if your family has grown up or you live alone for other reasons, then a dog is great company. Research has demonstrated that owning a pet, particularly a cat or dog, has the effect of reducing stress, and depressive tendencies. Therefore, having ‘someone to care for’ provides real and tangible health benefits.

Defenders

Springers are loyal and affectionate and will defend the family staunchly when they sense a threat; however, they are not aggressive and can be trusted around children. The one exception to this is that they can occasionally become aggressive in the company of other dogs of the same sex, but this would be directed against the other dogs.

Fun Lovers

They have happy personalities and love having fun. This is good for adults as well as children. Their love of fun can make them a bit boisterous at times, so tug of war games with very young children should not be encouraged.

More Fun – Retrieving

English Springers will hunt and retrieve for hours on end – they love a game of hide and seek with an old sock or glove – and this leads to loads of fun and a rich seam of photographs for the family album. They will always find a stick and proudly carry it around all day – this behaviour is deeply ingrained in their genes.

Unlike Many Other Pets

Unlike a gecko, a cat or a caged bird, dogs are much more interesting. They have distinctive personalities, and the English Springer is a very smart dog.

Family Exercise

These days, when we use an automobile to go anywhere, walking the dog is an important health discipline for us as well as the Springer.

Lower Feed Bills

As medium sized dogs, they weigh a lot less than Labradors or Golden Retrievers. Consequently, their feeding requirements are a lot less and hence they cost less to feed (typically $7-10 a week).

Transport

This medium size (an adult English Springer weighs about 50 lbs or 25 kg) means that they can easily be carried in a compact automobile, whereas a Golden Retriever would fill the rear seat by himself.

Good Health

Finally, they are generally pretty healthy and are not susceptible to very many hereditary conditions. This means that veterinarians’ bills should not be excessive. With average luck, the bills can be kept to vaccinations and annual checkups.

So, all in all, quite a wide range of reasons why an English springer spaniel makes a great pet and companion.

Source by Phil Marks