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Dog Training Starts With a Puppy

When you buy a puppy, you may think enjoying them and playing with them is all you need to do. The truth is, you need to start dog training early so the puppy learns the basic commands and behavior.

Housebreaking a puppy is easier if they understand basic commands and a few words. 'No' is a word that all puppies need to understand. This word will be used more than any other word you teach them as they start to grow into an adult dog. Dog training will include housebreaking, commands and obedience.

Housebreaking starts as soon as you bring the puppy home. This part of dog training can become frustrating if the puppy does not respond well to going outside. The first thing to remember is that taking the puppy outside should be done without any type of play. The puppy needs to learn that they are invited to use the outdoors for the bathroom. If a puppy learns quickly that they have to go to the bathroom outside, you can then start adding playtime after they have accomplished what they were supposed to do outside.

If the puppy has an accident in the house, you need to immediately take the puppy to the area and firmly tell them 'No, go outside', then take them outside until they realize what you mean. The puppy probably is not going to use the bathroom at this time, but they will understand what you mean after a few times. Dog training classes are the next thing to consider for your puppy.

In the dog training puppy classes, the puppy is taught the basic commands of sit, come, stay and lay down. These commands you will find are a blessing when you are in the house as well as outside. After puppy classes, you can move onto the next part of dog training, which is the obedience classes. These classes will teach the dog about walking, healing, down and addressing any other behavior problems you may notice. Puppies that are trained will grow up to be manageable and lovable dogs. If you do not provide some type of training, you will have an uncontrollable dog.

If you choose not to attend dog training classes, you can find some great dog training books that can help you train the puppy. Keep in mind that you must work with the puppy every day for a time or they will not retain what they are learning. Dog breeders and dog trainers will tell you that you should spend at least a half-hour a day on things being learned at the time. If you only train or practice once a week, the puppy is not going to remember what you have been teaching them. If you keep up with the training, you will have a great dog.

Source by Nicholas Hunt

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Making Dog – Cat Introductions

Since our Universe is made up of diverse people and some love cats and some love dogs, there comes a time when these two different types of people decide to co-exist together.

They are certain they can get along together, but what about their beloved pets? Well, with patience and planning, the cat and dog can learn to become friends. Maybe not best buddies, but can learn to live together, if you are patient enough to follow certain procedures.

First of all, you do not throw the two animals together and hope for the best. That will only create a situation where one or the other will get hurt or you will create a first impression of fear that neither one will ever forget. Once that happens, you will never have a peaceful co-existence no matter how hard you try.

The most important thing to take under consideration is the dog's attitude toward smaller creatures. Does the dog love to chase squirrels and / or other smaller animals? If so, it has developed a prey drive or enjoys the thrill of a chase. This can present problems when introducing a cat, which normally will run from a dog.

If you are not certain of the dog's reaction, take the dog (on a leash) out to where there are some squirrels or smaller dogs. There you can watch the dog's reaction to smaller creatures. If there is only a mild reaction, that is one hurdle conquered.

If the dog has done and killed squirrels and / or cats, forget it. There is no way you will ever be able to have a peaceful co-existence between the two animals. Do not even let that idea enter your mind, because it will not work no matter how hard you try, the desire will always be there to "get the cat."

As your human relationship unfolds and you think it is going to move into a more serious accomplishment, the time to think of bringing the other two members of the group together is now.

Once you have established that the dog is not going to hunt down the cat and have it for lunch.
My feeling is that the couple exchange pet blankets, now this might seem silly, but by bringing over each pet's blanket to the others home and letting the cat / dog smell it, is the first introduction. I would do this several times while you are in the process of determining what you are going to do with your relationship and living situation.

Once it is established that you are going to be together, bring the cat / dog to the place where you are going to be living. Keep the cat in a carrier and the dog on a leash. Watch the reaction between the two, if it is fairly calm, let the dog smell the cat in the carrier (keeping it restrained).

Feed the dog some treasures and if you also give the cat some through the screen. Keep the meeting short and do this for several days until you see that both pets are tolerating each other and seem a bit more relaxed.

In the meantime, keep the cat in a room with its food, water, litter box and toys.

It is suggested by the Hemane Society of the United States that you feed the pets on opposite sides of the door so that they get used to each other.

Other suggestions are:

  • For short periods of time exchange rooms, bringing the dog into the cat's space and let the cat roam the house, while the dog is defined.
  • Next put up a barrier (like a child's or pet gate) so they can see each other, watch the dog and if the dog shows intense interest or attempts to push down the gate beware.
  • If they seem calm and not nervous try a cat to dog approach, leash the dog and have it in a stay / sit position and let the cat out to wander at its desecration. Keep the dog calm and sitting.
  • If the dog shows aggression, calmly remove the dog and do not scold or punish, if the cat shows aggression, remove the cat and start all over again with the barrier bit.
  • Never allow the dog to chase the cat, no matter how cute is may seem, that could lead to a dead cat, one day.
  • Do not allow the pets to be alone with each other until you are absolutely positive that they are friends. You need to supervise all the time.
  • Make sure the cat has an escape hatch, a high place to go that the dog can not get to it.
  • Keep their food separate, do not let the dog eat the cat food and do not let the cat near the dog when it is eating.
  • If after 10 days the animals are not relaxed and tolerating each other all your efforts, know when to say when. If it does not look like it is going to work find a new home for the cat / dog, by doing that you may be saving a life.
  • Animals are just like people, some we like and some we do not, there is no way to know until you try and even with the best of efforts it does not work. What ever you do, do not leave them alone to work it ourselves, the end result could and would be disaster.

    Source by Audrey Frederick

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    Rhodesian Ridgeback Puppy And Dog Information

    The Rhodesian Ridgeback can live in an apartment if given sufficient long walks. They do best with a properly fenced in enclosure. This breed needs to be intensely socialized early if it is to get along with other pets and dogs. They may not get along with children, especially young nagging ones. As a rule, they are great watch dogs and very protective of their master and family. As a reminder, never leave a child unsupervised with a puppy or dog.

    Approximate Adult Size

    The approximate adult size (two years old or older) of the male Rhodesian Ridgeback is 25 to 27 inches to the withers (highest point of the shoulder) and 80 to 90 pounds. The female ranges from 24 to 26 inches to the withers and 65 to 75 pounds.

    Special Health Considerations

    Most dog breeds have certain inherited health problems associated with that specific breed and the Rhodesian Ridgeback is no exception. They are considered to be a very hardy and healthy breed. Be on the lookout for sinus problems, cysts and Canine Hip Dysplasia (genetic based looseness in the hip joint that can lead to arthritis pain and lameness). This disease list is an informative guideline only. Other diseases may also be significant threats, please contact your veterinarian for a complete list.

    She should visit the veterinarian several times in the first year for shots, boosters and check up. Then, as an adult, she should visit the veterinarian year for shots and check up. As she gets older, six years and on, she should visit the veterinarian twice a year for check ups and shots. Remember; avoid feeding your dog sweets.

    Grooming

    The Rhodesian Ridgeback has a short, sleek, glossy and dense coat. This easy to care for coat should be brushed regularly. Brushing will help her maintain a clean and healthy coat, avoid mats, help you keep a close eye on her health and strengthen your emotional bond with her.

    Her teeth should be brushed at least twice a week with toothpaste and toothbrush designed for dogs. Brushing removes the accumulation of plaque and tartar which can cause cavities (rarely) and periodontal disease. Dog periodontal disease can lead to pain, loss of teeth, bad breath and other serious disease.

    Her toenails may need to be examined for growth and clipped regularly. The toenails of the rear feet grow slower than the toenails of the front feet.

    Life Span

    The Rhodesian Ridgeback can live between 10 and 12 years with proper nutrition, medical care and excellent living conditions.

    History

    The Rhodesian Ridgeback comes from Zimbabwe where they were used to hunt big game including lions. They were first registered by the American Kennel Association in 1955.

    Some Registries

    • Rhodesian Ridgeback Club of America
    • UKC United Kennel Club
    • NKC National Kennel Club
    • CKC Continental Kennel Club
    • APRI Americas Pet Registry Inc.
    • AKC American Kennel Club
    • FCI Federation Cynologique Internationale
    • NZKC New Zealand Kennel Club
    • KCGB Kennel Club of Great Britain
    • ANKC Australian National Kennel Club
    • ACR American Canine Registry

    Litter Size

    7 to 8 Rhodesian Ridgeback puppies

    Category

    Hound Group

    Terms To Describe

    Dignified, muscular, strong, athletic, handsome, balanced, endurance, devoted, affectionate

    SPECIAL GOOD POINTS

    • Very good watch dog.
    • Very good guard dog.
    • Very intelligent.

    SPECIAL BAD POINTS

    • Need to be obedienced trained.
    • Need an experienced owner.
    • Must be socialized with pets and dogs.
    • May not like children.

    Other Names Known By

    African Lion Hound, Lion Dog, Ridegeback

    Every dog ​​is an individual so not everything in this information may be correct for your dog. This information is meant as a good faith guideline only.

    Source by Mitch Endick

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    Puppy Care Tips, Advice For Dog Owners: A How To For Pets

    What Are The Dangers For New Puppies? Let's Get Safer!

    New puppy owners beware, purchasing a new puppy is a thrilling experience for everyone involved, but at the same time, it's a great responsibility. You want the young puppy to grow up into a healthy adult, preferably with a friendly personality to match. However, the most fragile time in a dog's life is early on, within the first six months to be exact. Until that age, the puppy will need to be provided with special care from you, their new owner, to help guarantee they reach adulthood safely. And guess what? I want to help you out, so listen up … please. I asked nicely!

    To help a puppy reach the age of 6 months without any problems, let's take an essential in-depth look at a few of the dangers that may threaten a new puppy's life, how we can prevent those dangers from occurring, and how we can shape a puppy's personality to be one oozing with affection.

    The Danger: Temperature – Well, I'll tell you the dangers. There are many to consider, but I'll highlight the important ones. The first danger is a simple one but can be easily overlooked. It's the temperature of your house. Think about that for a second, what temperature does your house usually hover around during the winter? How about the summer? What about in general? It is common for households to range anywhere from 65-85F (18-29 C), and anything below 72F is slightly too cold for newer puppies and poses a threat to their safety.

    Sure, 72F may feel comfortable to you, and is perfectly acceptable for full grown adult dogs, but puppies are fragile and can not be exposed to low temperatures for long periods of time. Houses cool down late at night, so think about this: when you are fast sleep, you use blankets to keep warm. A puppy, however, only has his fur and that's not enough to keep him warm. So while you're all cozy laying in that soft bed, the poor puppy may be suffering from the cold and a chilling death might not be far off for them.

    Prevention: A trusty heating pad will solve all of these troubles, and keep the puppy nice and warm at night. All you need to do is acquire one somehow, I suggest by buying it! Once you get a heating pad, it is imperative to check the temperature. Ideally, the temperature should stay warm and consistent, but nothing overbearing. Some heating pads may get too hot, though, which is why you want to check before using it.

    If the pad is reaching uncomfortable temperatures, a method you can use to help make it more comfy is by wrapping it in a towel. The towel will absorb a fair amount of heat, plus adding some additional softness to the hard surface. Perfect for the puppy to lay down on, the puppy will be pleased with your efforts.

    Worth noting, when inserting the heating pad into the puppy's playpen, arrange it in such a way that the pad does not cover the entire surface area of ​​the pen. Otherwise, the puppy will be stuck on a heated surface with no choice to step off, and that is mighty uncomfortable. It'd be like getting stuck on a hot sidewalk with no shoes, yikes! When you are finished, the puppy will be protected from the cold, allowing you to sleep better at night knowing they are safe and sound.

    The Danger: Other Unfriendly Pets – Do you have any other pets surrounding the new puppy roaming around? If the answer is yes, then consider their personalities. How friendly are they, and will they accept a new animal with open arms? You know the attitude of your pets more than I do, but in order to keep your new puppy safe we ​​need to think and weigh all the possible outcomes.

    Remember, animals can be friendly towards humans, but towards other animals it can be an entirely different story. Young puppies are very playful, and will probably attempt to provoke your other pets to get them to play. Whether your pets view those good-intentioned gestures as a friendly invitation for fun or an act of war, who knows? Only you do!

    Prevention: If your other pet is unfriendly towards the new pet puppy, then it's a serious problem. No doubt the unfriendly one is bigger since they are probably older, so what you'll have to do is isolate them. Keep them separated until the young puppy grows up and is able to defend himself. Have them interact with one another on a daily basis, with your supervision. This will help your unfriendly pet become more familiar with the puppy. Hopefully with time, the mean pet will become a bit more generous.

    The Danger: Electrical Wires – You flip the switch and the light turns on, an every day occurrence for millions of houses. Electricity flows through each of them, powering our microwaves and refrigerators, along with other convenient appliances we use. Some of these appliances come with cords power them. The cords have electricity running through them.

    It's not just your pet puppy you have to worry about, it's any pet that can have a chewing habit. Needless to say, dogs love to chew on things, and last time I checked, cords are things. That's right, if you look around right now, do you see any electrical cords sitting on the floor? I bet you do, and those are all potential health hazards. Even the heating pad I talked about earlier has a cord it uses, and your puppy will chew through it if given enough time. I'll spare the details on what happens when dog or puppy gets a mouthful of electricity, but I will give you a hint: it's really bad. Here's one more hint: It's also deadly! Okay no more hints.

    Prevention: To avert this disaster, relocate the cords that are vulnerable on the floor to a safer place. If you have tape, use that to neatly pack the cords together, possibly taping them high on the wall away from your pets. Undoubtedly, not all cords can be moved, and in those cases, use cord covers. As the name implies, they cover the cords and prevent animals from chewing through. Remember to use a cord cover on the heating pad in the puppy's playpen, as new owners sometimes miss that. So watt are you waiting for, go secure those dangerous cords. I wrote the previous sentence just so I could use that pun, sorry.

    Making The Puppy Comfortable

    Alright, we've learned about 4 possible dangers that have potential to be hazardous to a new puppy's health and what we can do to prevent such disasters. Now, let's take a look on how to make the life of our puppy more comfortable. A comfortable puppy is a happy puppy, and a happy puppy is a healthy one!

    Many owners restrict the area a puppy is able to move around in. This is vital if you do not always have the time to keep a constant watch over them, and you probably do not. Most of the time, playpens or small dog gates are used to limit their movement, so think about buying one of those. I suggest a playpen, as I find them to be more convenient than setting up gates.

    As for where to put the playpen, I advise in a quiet part of your house, away from any noise. This playpen is going to serve not just as a way to restrict their movement, but also as a place of rest. Puppies need plenty of rest to maintain their youthful energy and health. Places you should avoid setting up resting areas in, include spots like directly next to a furnace or fireplace. Drafty areas, like next to a fan or vent are not recommended either. A drapty area could dry out a puppy's throat as they sleep, making it sore when they wake.

    Include necessary things a puppy might need when it's resting. A heating pad wrapped in a towel is one, how about food and water? I've heard feeding puppies is a great way to help them continue living, so have that available to them at all times. For entertainment purposes, buy a couple of toys for their amusement. Chewing toys will also focus their attention away from any dangling cords.

    Let's see … a playpen, a warm heating pad, food and water, fun toys; things are looking good for our new fragile animal friend. But something is missing, do you know what it is?

    The owner's love! That's right, while trying to ensure the puppy's protection and comfort, we forgot to show them the most serious thing: our love. Aw!

    Do not forget it, neither. Providing a young puppy affection and positivity as they grow will have a lasting affect on their personality later on. A puppy's attitude will reflect what's shown to them. Show them tons of love, and they will most certainly mirror it right back, which is precisely what all new puppy owners dream of having; A fun, loving, loyal companion. Hopefully this little guide will help you achieve just that.

    Source by Mike J Boura

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    Whippet Puppy And Dog Information

    The Whippet is a sensitive, intelligent and sweet dog. They make good watch dogs. They need plenty of exercise and a safe place to let them run would be ideal. They are generally not to be trusted with other pets as they may consider them fair game. They are said to do well with other canines and children, especially if well socialized when young. As a reminder, never leave a child unsupervised with a puppy or dog.

    Approximate Adult Size

    The approximate adult size (two years old or older) of the Whippet is 17 to 20 inches to the withers (highest point of the shoulder) and 18 to 28 pounds.

    Special Health Considerations

    Most dog breeds have certain inherited health problems associated with that specific breed and the Whippet is no exception. Be on the look out for skin problems, upset stomach, genetic eye disease and sunburn. This disease list is an informative guideline only. Other diseases may also be significant threats, please contact your veterinarian for a complete list.

    She should visit the veterinarian several times in the first year for shots, boosters and check up. Then, as an adult, she should visit the veterinarian year for shots and check up. As she gets older, six years and on, she should visit the veterinarian twice a year for check ups and shots. Remember; avoid feeding your dog sweets.

    Grooming

    The Whippet has a smooth, firm, short, close and easy to care for coat. She should be brushed and rubbed down with a damp chamois regularly. Brushing will help her maintain a clean and healthy coat, avoid mats, help you keep a close eye on her health and strengthen your emotional bond with her.

    Her teeth should be brushed at least twice a week with toothpaste and toothbrush designed for dogs. Brushing removes the accumulation of plaque and tartar which can cause cavities (rarely) and periodontal disease. Dog periodontal disease can lead to pain, loss of teeth, bad breath and other serious disease.

    Her toenails may need to be examined for growth and clipped regularly. The toenails of the rear feet grow slower than the toenails of the front feet.

    Life Span

    The Whippet can live between 12 and 15 years with proper nutrition, medical care and excellent living conditions.

    History

    The Whippet comes from Great Britain where they were used for hunting fast small game and later radcing. They were first registered by the American Kennel Association in 1888.

    Some Registries

    • UKC United Kennel Club
    • NKC National Kennel Club
    • CKC Continental Kennel Club
    • APRI Americas Pet Registry Inc.
    • AKC American Kennel Club
    • FCI Federation Cynologique Internationale
    • NZKC New Zealand Kennel Club
    • KCGB Kennel Club of Great Britain
    • ANKC Australian National Kennel Club
    • ACR American Canine Registry

    Litter Size

    4 to 8 Whippet puppies

    Category

    Hound

    Terms To Describe

    Elegant, fit, speed, power, strength, balance, affectionate, friendly, gentle

    SPECIAL GOOD POINTS

    • Pretty much odor free coat.
    • Makes a good watch dog.

    SPECIAL BAD POINTS

    • Does poorly in cold climates.
    • Makes a poor guard dog.

    Every dog ​​is an individual so not everything in this information may be correct for your dog. This information is meant as a good faith guideline only.

    Source by Mitch Endick

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    Puppy Dog Toilet Training – Guidelines102

    For dogs it is natural not to spoil the place where they sleep, eat and play. Instinctively and fast they will develop a regular place to do there needs. You are going to be using these natural dogs behavior pattern to house train your puppy.

    It is important to begin that your dog has his own place. This place can be a small room; any specific space for him will do it. In that place you will put his food, water, toys and his bed. Make sure that it is a place where he can not get out and do not forget to leave him there when you get out of the house. You'll also want to cover up the floor with newspaper.

    Puppies have a very limited control over there bladder, that is why you need to limit his access to the entire house by putting him in a small room. What you want is to keep the accidents in the house in the minimum. Take the puppy outside every 30 to 45 minutes when you are around. The crate can be a good way for toilet training because even if he's restricted your dog can still be close to you being able to see and ear you.

    You can take him out of his limited area only when you are around to watch over him. When your dog begin to turn in circles and sniffing around, it's the time to take him outside as fast as possible, that behavior generally means that he need to ease himself. Dogs give signs when they feel the need to tie themselves As he get older and he can hold on longer, keep him around with you, as you observe him for longer period of time.

    Do not forget that dog potty training notions have to do with when you take your dog outside. Regularly take your dog outside after meal is a good tactic when you want to decrease the probability of accidents in the house. Every time he does it outside you can give a treat or praise him. By doing that your dog will remember what comes with doing his poop and pee outside.

    Puppy dog ​​toilet training take time, patience and good routine so you and your new dog can spend good time together.

    Source by Nancy Savard

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    Puppy Training & Dog Training

    Puppies and dogs are reliable, usually sensible and sometimes funny. You can never stay angry at them for long and the eyes, when they stare at you, seem to be pleading, asking, begging for something more, but you got to love them. They bring happiness and make their owners smile, with their goofy walking and puppy eyes.

    Puppies are innocent and forgiving; they see everything as a fun game where everyone should be playing. Loving your puppy will help them love you; they will become part of your family. Puppies seem to be a fountain of understanding; they know when you feel down and try to comfort you with a nice warm kiss and a little cuddle.

    Yet innocence can be deceiving, without puppy training, discipline can be tough and they can become a hell hole. Chunks start disappearing from the couch and your favorite shoes start looking like something mauled by a wild bear. Stinky, warm patches appear in the most unbelievably places and the plants are not where you last left them.

    Puppy training is the second thing you look for after you realize that you new furry best friend has just relief themselves all over the kitchen floor; the first being the paper towers that you can never sees to find. Puppy potty training can help fix this problem as can puppy training and behavior training help you enjoy more your new friend. There are many training hints and tips out there even for those dogs older dogs looking for that odd bit of obedience training.

    So it's in your and your furniture's best interest to train your puppy.

    A well train puppy will grow up into a happy, healthy dog, who will love you as long as you look after them properly and you and your dog will be happy.

    Source by Ronald Fritz

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    Choosing the Right Breed of Dog

    Before choosing a specific breed of dog to bring into your home let's go over a few things to help you make that important decision. Recognized breeds are put into groups according to the job they were originally bred for. These groups are Sporting Dogs, Hounds, Working Dogs, Terriers, Toys, Herding and Non-sporting Dogs. Among the different groups you will find a variety of size and breeds to choose from. Some breeds must be kept busy mentally as well as physically active. Others were developed as companion animals. Most breeds fall somewhere in between these extremes.

    The size of the dog will vary breed to breed of the dog and life span rates from 6 yrs. to 16 yrs. with proper care depending on the breed. Choose a dog that matches your housing. Large active dogs are not suited for apartment living. Outside dogs need appropriate sized fenced yard, weather protected shelter with access to fresh water and food. Tying a dog should only be used as a temporary arrangement and a tied dog should never be left unattended.

    Things to consider are having location and space for the breed of dog, spaying or neutering the dog, committing the time necessary for giving the dog exercise and play time, researching the breed and becoming knowledgeable in the breed and knowing what is involved in it's care , know that a dog takes a lot of time and money for veterinary care and keeping vaccinations up to date and last but not least be a responsible pet owner. If you can provide all these things then getting a dog may be the right choice for you.

    If getting a purebred breed of dog is not for you then check out your local Animal Shelter. You can always find a variety of adult dogs and puppies available. Shelters usually put their dogs through temperament testing, food aggression testing, and testing to see how they react with other dogs and cats. They usually match a family to the right pet for them. You can interact with several dogs and make a final choice on the one that is right for you.

    Some supplies needed for the dog consist of proper fitting collar, leashes for walking, play toys, nutritious dog food, treats, water and food bowls. A Kennel Crate sized for the dog is a great thing to have. It can provide a training source for housebreaking and keeping the pet bound when needed. It also provides the dog a place to go for a nap when the door is kept open. Placed in a vehicle it is a safe way to transport a dog to the Vet or for short trips.

    I hope this information is helpful to you in making the choice on getting a Dog.

    Source by Robert Cunningham

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    Feeding Your Puppy Or Dog

    Protein is vital for growth, and it is also for restoring damaged tissue – particularly muscle. This is the reason why it is required in high amounts in the diets of growing puppies. Carbohydrates and fats make up the main energy source of a puppy's body. Fats offer more energy than carbohydrates and are necessary in tiny amounts for a strong skin and coat. (((As your puppy grows into an adult dog, their needs for these nutrients will change, and it will be your duty to make sure that they are getting the right diet for every stage they are in. The two most general forms of dog food are the tinned meat and the dry foods which are becoming more and more popular.

    (Dry dog ​​food has quite a few advantages for both the dog and the owners. These foods are hygienic and easy to give to your puppy. to be given together with some dry food.

    (It is probable to give your puppy a home prepared diet, but you should always keep in mind the value of providing the right nutritional balance. who controls their food. Try and involve all members of the household with feeding times, you can even take turns in giving your puppy food.

    Make sure that you are in control of mealtimes, and never feed your puppy scraps from them table. Let your puppy see how you are preparing their meal, and command them to sit while you are doing so. (

    Never let your puppy eat alone. Stay with them and from time to time stroke them. They should get used to being in the vicinity of others while consuming their food. This will help you to stay in control of your puppy.

    Source by John M Williams

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    Brussels Griffon Puppy And Dog Information

    The Brussels Griffon is a lovable, companion dog that does well in a house or apartment. She does require some coat grooming but she is happy, has a big personality and will add joy to most families.

    Good With Children?

    Not well suited but may be OK with older children as long as they have been socialized with her when she is young.

    Good With Other Pets?

    Yes.

    Temperament

    The Brussels Griffon is a lively, cheerful dog full of life and curiosity. She makes a good companion dog but loves to be spoiled. She should be kept in the house with the family but have access to frequent walks for air and exercise.

    Trainability

    Can be difficult to train. She can be stubborn.

    Approximate Adult Size

    The approximate adult size (two years old or older) of the Brussels Griffon is 7 to 8 inches to the withers (highest point of the shoulder) and 6 to 12 pounds.

    Special Health Considerations

    Most dog breeds have certain inherited health problems associated with that specific breed and the Brussels Griffon is no exception. They can have respiratory problems, eye problems (prominent eyes forward to damage), difficulty giving birth, subluxated patella, and her teeth can require care. This disease list is an informative guideline only. Other diseases may also be significant threats, please contact your veterinarian for a complete list.

    She should visit the veterinarian several times in the first year for shots, boosters and check up. Then, as an adult, she should visit the veterinarian year for shots and check up. As she gets older, six years and on, she should visit the veterinarian twice a year for check ups and shots. Remember; avoid feeding your dog sweets.

    Grooming

    The Brussels Griffon has two coat varieties, one being harsh with dense, wiry hair and the other being smooth covered, glossy and short. She should be brushed regularly. Brushing will help her maintain a clean and healthy coat, avoid mats and help you keep a close eye on her health and strengthen your emotional bond with her.

    Her teeth should be brushed at least twice a week with toothpaste and toothbrush designed for dogs. Brushing removes the accumulation of plaque and tartar which can cause cavities (rarely) and periodontal disease. Dog periodontal disease can lead to pain, loss of teeth, bad breath and other serious disease.

    Her toenails may need to be examined for growth and clipped regularly. The toenails of the rear feet grow slower than the toenails of the front feet. Generally a guillotine type trimmer is the best for this chore and competent instructions to accomplish this can be found on the net.

    Life Span

    The Brussels Griffon can live between 8 and 10 years with proper nutrition, medical care and excellent living conditions.

    History

    The Brussels Griffon comes from Belgium. They were developed from the Affenpinscher, Ruby English Toy Spaniel and the Dutch Pug. They cam to America in mid 1880. They were first registered by the American Kennel Association in 1910.

    Some Registries

    • American Brussels Griffon Association.
    • UKC United Kennel Club
    • NKC National Kennel Club
    • CKC Continental Kennel Club
    • APRI Americas Pet Registry Inc.
    • AKC American Kennel Club
    • FCI Federation Cynologique Internationale
    • NZKC New Zealand Kennel Club
    • KCGB Kennel Club of Great Britain
    • ANKC Australian National Kennel Club
    • ACR American Canine Registry

    Litter Size

    1 to 3 Brussels Griffon puppies

    Category

    Toy

    Terms To Describe

    Independent, active, intelligent, stubborn, bluffer

    SPECIAL GOOD POINTS

    • Intelligent.
    • Good watch dog.
    • Loves to be part of the family.
    • They are so human like that they are sometimes called monkey face.

    SPECIAL BAD POINTS

    • Can be stubborn.
    • May have problems being obedient.
    • Not a guard dog.
    • Does not like cold weather.
    • May be difficult to housebreak,
    • They can tend to be barkers.

    Other Names Known By

    Briffon Belge, Griffin Bruxellois, Belgian Griffon, Griff, Brussels, monkey face

    Every dog ​​is an individual so not everything in this information may be correct for your dog. This information is meant as a good faith guideline only.

    Source by Mitch Endick